Category: matchmaking attempts


September 1st, 2013 — 1:40pm

When you’re single, it is inevitable from time to time that well intentioned people will offer to set you up. What I’m increasingly discovering, though, is the gesture rarely materializes.

Over the last couple of months, three different people have mentioned bachelor friends who they would like to introduce me to. Knowing the trepidation that often comes with trying to play Cupid, I reassured each of them by sharing my no-fault matchmaking policy – i.e., no sparks, no problem. After all, mutual chemistry is unpredictable enough that you can’t really hold someone accountable when it doesn’t happen.

I also make it a point to say I’m flexible about how the connection is initiated – open to either providing my contact info or reaching out to the bachelor in question. In a previous life, the traditionalist in me would have insisted on the guy initiating communication. But having been through the anything goes world of online dating, speed dating and just about everything in between, I’ve learned you can’t stand on ceremony and be completely rules driven if you want to meet someone new.

If only matchmaking-minded folks were equally progressive.

Two of the recent would-be Cupids backpedaled as soon as I indicated my openness to taking them up on their offer. They suggested it would be “less pressure” if I were to meet their bachelor friends in a group setting. Less pressure, no doubt, on them for the matchmaking attempt to be successful.

Why create obstacles to the very objective you’re supposedly trying to facilitate? And why state you’re inclined to play matchmaker if you’re not going to actually follow through on it?

Some would argue it’s the thought that counts here. I say, unless you’re actually willing to put words to action, it’s probably best to keep any matchmaking thoughts to yourself.

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February 3rd, 2012 — 8:16am

(photo courtesy: online-matchmaker.org)

I’ve always been a big believer in getting out of my comfort zone and shaking things up. That’s why I’ve dubbed 2012 the year of Just Say Yes. And it is in that spirit of open mindedness that I am excited to announce my next big adventure – Nominate A Date.

Beginning February 14th, I will spend the better part of eight weeks going on a series of blind dates. Each date will be with a bachelor of anyone’s choosing. Yes, that means if you’re willing to take the time to play matchmaker, I will go out with whoever you connect me with.

As longtime readers of this blog know, this isn’t my first experiment in seeing how social media and dating intersect. In 2010, I embarked on two Dating Blitzes – one across the U.S., the other in Europe – that connected me with many smart, fabulous single men and women. I learned so much from both experiences, but perhaps the greatest lesson was how important it is to savor the journey of singlehood and not be defined by where you want it to take you.

So what makes Nominate A Date different? The obvious answer, of course, is that this two month adventure will take place right here in my hometown. After exploring single life in eight other cities and six other countries, it feels right to come back to where I started – a little older and (hopefully) wiser.  And what better place to apply another major insight from both blitzes, that everyone has a touch of Cupid in them?

There are only two ground rules for Nominate A Date — each date must take place here in NYC and all bachelors must be between the ages of 27 and 47. Why such a big age spread? Because this experience is all about casting aside any preconceived notions about dating ‘types.’ And – full disclosure here — having been raised by a happily married couple with a 25-year age difference who adored each other, I’m one of those people who doesn’t think such gaps are an obstacle to chemistry.

I hope you’ll join me — and help spread the word — as I embark on this exciting new chapter. to see my YouTube video about Nominate A Date and feel free to email me at SingleGalInTheCity@gmail.com with any questions. In addition to my blog updates, you can follow my adventure on Twitter with hashtag #NominateADate.

Who will you nominate? Let the matchmaking begin!

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February 14th, 2009 — 4:48pm

In the course of my four+ years in travel PR, I’ve had the good fortune of working on some groundbreaking campaigns.

From Starwood Caribbean’s award-winning package (named by yours truly) to Tourism Queensland’s current global phenomenon, , these initiatives have taught me the tremendous value of getting your message out to as broad an audience as possible.

Now, inspired by friend and colleague Carla, I’ve decided to apply my PR savvy to a more personal objective — finding Mr. Right.

When it comes to PR, the best ideas are often the simplest ones and so, I’m forgoing stunts in favor of deploying good old fashioned word of mouth to achieve my goal.

Who Should I date? You tell me!

I’ve already taken a few steps in this direction, putting friends, family and business associates on notice that I’m open to matchmaking attempts. Now, I’m asking you, dear readers, to play Cupid and answer the question — who do you think I should date? Do you know a great guy — or know someone who might know one — that’s single and looking?

When it comes to bachelors, I don’t necessarily have a physical type. As I once told , I’ve dated everything from short and balding to tall and muscular. I do have a few prerequisites, though. Here they are:

Age range: 35-45
Zip code: Anywhere in the tri-state area (NY, NJ, CT)
Must Haves: Intelligence, spirituality, ambition, a well-worn passport
Dealbreakers: Cats, dogs, small kids, no sense of humor
Optional: Enjoys Scrabble, concerts and a good meal

Feel free to forward this post far and wide — viral marketing is key to any successful PR program — and email me your suggested Mr. Right candidates at bravermanmelissa@gmail.com.

I can’t think of a better date than February 14th to launch a plan for finding a permanent sweetheart. Happy Valentine’s Day, Everyone!

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February 14th, 2009 — 11:48am

In the course of my four+ years in travel PR, I’ve had the good fortune of working on some groundbreaking campaigns.

From Starwood Caribbean’s award-winning package (named by yours truly) to Tourism Queensland’s current global phenomenon, , these initiatives have taught me the tremendous value of getting your message out to as broad an audience as possible.

Now, inspired by friend and colleague Carla, I’ve decided to apply my PR savvy to a more personal objective — finding Mr. Right.

When it comes to PR, the best ideas are often the simplest ones and so, I’m forgoing stunts in favor of deploying good old fashioned word of mouth to achieve my goal.

Who Should I date? You tell me!

I’ve already taken a few steps in this direction, putting friends, family and business associates on notice that I’m open to matchmaking attempts. Now, I’m asking you, dear readers, to play Cupid and answer the question — who do you think I should date? Do you know a great guy — or know someone who might know one — that’s single and looking?

When it comes to bachelors, I don’t necessarily have a physical type. As I once told , I’ve dated everything from short and balding to tall and muscular. I do have a few prerequisites, though. Here they are:

Age range: 35-45
Zip code: Anywhere in the tri-state area (NY, NJ, CT)
Must Haves: Intelligence, spirituality, ambition, a well-worn passport
Dealbreakers: Cats, dogs, small kids, no sense of humor
Optional: Enjoys Scrabble, concerts and a good meal

Feel free to forward this post far and wide — viral marketing is key to any successful PR program — and email me your suggested Mr. Right candidates at bravermanmelissa@gmail.com.

I can’t think of a better date than February 14th to launch a plan for finding a permanent sweetheart. Happy Valentine’s Day, Everyone!

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November 18th, 2008 — 7:39pm
The other night, I heard from Michael, a guy that my friend and fellow travel PR maven/blogger wants to set me up with. As we chatted about our mutual appreciation for Latin dancing and NYC’s theater scene, I couldn’t help thinking about the unpredictability of blind dates – and some of the memorable setups I’ve experienced.

There’s been no shortage of blind dates that failed to ignite any sparks. Like the tête à tête with a 40-something businessman who scoffed at my decision to leave the world of TV news behind for a career in PR. Or the who kept me waiting for a half an hour then proceeded to talk only about himself.

For every lackluster matchmaking attempt, though, I’ve been fortunate enough to experience a few blind date successes that made those disappointing evenings worth it.

Ten years ago, a college friend’s British-born husband suggested I meet up with David, a friend of his who had just moved to the Big Apple. The chemistry between us was immediate. Over the course of a year and a half together, David would become my good guy benchmark, seeing me through the devastating loss of my mother and taking the grand gesture to a whole new level with roses by the hundred.

Parade of Roses: Five dozen of the twenty-five dozen (!) roses that my British beau David gave me for my 25th birthday, January 1999

In 2001, at the tail end of my year-long TV reporter stint in Southern Illinois, my neighbor’s daughter invited me to dinner with her stepson Steve. I ended up changing my return flight to New York three times, as Steve and I fell into one of the most passionate romances I’ve ever had. Our friendship endures to this day.

Michael and I are scheduled to meet for drinks sometime this week. Though It’s too soon to tell how this latest go round of blind date roulette will turn out, I’m just happy to be back in the game.

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November 18th, 2008 — 2:39pm
The other night, I heard from Michael, a guy that my friend and fellow travel PR maven/blogger wants to set me up with. As we chatted about our mutual appreciation for Latin dancing and NYC’s theater scene, I couldn’t help thinking about the unpredictability of blind dates – and some of the memorable setups I’ve experienced.

There’s been no shortage of blind dates that failed to ignite any sparks. Like the tête à tête with a 40-something businessman who scoffed at my decision to leave the world of TV news behind for a career in PR. Or the who kept me waiting for a half an hour then proceeded to talk only about himself.

For every lackluster matchmaking attempt, though, I’ve been fortunate enough to experience a few blind date successes that made those disappointing evenings worth it.

Ten years ago, a college friend’s British-born husband suggested I meet up with David, a friend of his who had just moved to the Big Apple. The chemistry between us was immediate. Over the course of a year and a half together, David would become my good guy benchmark, seeing me through the devastating loss of my mother and taking the grand gesture to a whole new level with roses by the hundred.

Parade of Roses: Five dozen of the twenty-five dozen (!) roses that my British beau David gave me for my 25th birthday, January 1999

In 2001, at the tail end of my year-long TV reporter stint in Southern Illinois, my neighbor’s daughter invited me to dinner with her stepson Steve. I ended up changing my return flight to New York three times, as Steve and I fell into one of the most passionate romances I’ve ever had. Our friendship endures to this day.

Michael and I are scheduled to meet for drinks sometime this week. Though It’s too soon to tell how this latest go round of blind date roulette will turn out, I’m just happy to be back in the game.

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