Category: matchmaking


September 1st, 2013 — 1:40pm

When you’re single, it is inevitable from time to time that well intentioned people will offer to set you up. What I’m increasingly discovering, though, is the gesture rarely materializes.

Over the last couple of months, three different people have mentioned bachelor friends who they would like to introduce me to. Knowing the trepidation that often comes with trying to play Cupid, I reassured each of them by sharing my no-fault matchmaking policy – i.e., no sparks, no problem. After all, mutual chemistry is unpredictable enough that you can’t really hold someone accountable when it doesn’t happen.

I also make it a point to say I’m flexible about how the connection is initiated – open to either providing my contact info or reaching out to the bachelor in question. In a previous life, the traditionalist in me would have insisted on the guy initiating communication. But having been through the anything goes world of online dating, speed dating and just about everything in between, I’ve learned you can’t stand on ceremony and be completely rules driven if you want to meet someone new.

If only matchmaking-minded folks were equally progressive.

Two of the recent would-be Cupids backpedaled as soon as I indicated my openness to taking them up on their offer. They suggested it would be “less pressure” if I were to meet their bachelor friends in a group setting. Less pressure, no doubt, on them for the matchmaking attempt to be successful.

Why create obstacles to the very objective you’re supposedly trying to facilitate? And why state you’re inclined to play matchmaker if you’re not going to actually follow through on it?

Some would argue it’s the thought that counts here. I say, unless you’re actually willing to put words to action, it’s probably best to keep any matchmaking thoughts to yourself.

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February 3rd, 2012 — 8:16am

(photo courtesy: online-matchmaker.org)

I’ve always been a big believer in getting out of my comfort zone and shaking things up. That’s why I’ve dubbed 2012 the year of Just Say Yes. And it is in that spirit of open mindedness that I am excited to announce my next big adventure – Nominate A Date.

Beginning February 14th, I will spend the better part of eight weeks going on a series of blind dates. Each date will be with a bachelor of anyone’s choosing. Yes, that means if you’re willing to take the time to play matchmaker, I will go out with whoever you connect me with.

As longtime readers of this blog know, this isn’t my first experiment in seeing how social media and dating intersect. In 2010, I embarked on two Dating Blitzes – one across the U.S., the other in Europe – that connected me with many smart, fabulous single men and women. I learned so much from both experiences, but perhaps the greatest lesson was how important it is to savor the journey of singlehood and not be defined by where you want it to take you.

So what makes Nominate A Date different? The obvious answer, of course, is that this two month adventure will take place right here in my hometown. After exploring single life in eight other cities and six other countries, it feels right to come back to where I started – a little older and (hopefully) wiser.  And what better place to apply another major insight from both blitzes, that everyone has a touch of Cupid in them?

There are only two ground rules for Nominate A Date — each date must take place here in NYC and all bachelors must be between the ages of 27 and 47. Why such a big age spread? Because this experience is all about casting aside any preconceived notions about dating ‘types.’ And – full disclosure here — having been raised by a happily married couple with a 25-year age difference who adored each other, I’m one of those people who doesn’t think such gaps are an obstacle to chemistry.

I hope you’ll join me — and help spread the word — as I embark on this exciting new chapter. to see my YouTube video about Nominate A Date and feel free to email me at SingleGalInTheCity@gmail.com with any questions. In addition to my blog updates, you can follow my adventure on Twitter with hashtag #NominateADate.

Who will you nominate? Let the matchmaking begin!

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June 6th, 2010 — 5:14pm

Earlier this week, I blogged about a new matchmaking comedy Internet series called . I’ve just learned that host J. Keith van Straaten is still actively looking for singles willing to be set up live on stage by a celebrity and two of your friends.

If you’re feeling adventurous, ASAP to submit info about yourself and the type of person you would like to meet.

You can find additional details about The Fix-Up Show on the program’s

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November 15th, 2008 — 3:22am

Earlier this week, I caught up with fellow travel PR maven and blogger Lyla () over brunch at one of my favorite neighborhood bistros, Beach Café.

Beach Cafe: This Upper East Side bistro is one of my favorites

As I enjoyed a delicious egg-white omelette loaded with cheddar cheese and spinach, newlywedded Lyla and I talked about the camaraderie of the blogging community and the challenges of thirty-something singlehood in NYC. While musing about the latter, we found ourselves discussing a peculiar phenomenon — male reticence about becoming involved in the matchmaking process.

Sex And The City’s Charlotte once suggested that the single friends of married men are “the city’s greatest untapped resource.” Both Lyla and I have found quite the opposite to be true, largely because it seems men aren’t often likely to recommend any of their friends for a blind date.

In fact, whenever I’ve asked guys who are spoken for if they have any nice, single friends, the response is usually no. I can’t help wondering — is this really because they don’t have any normal peers or simply because they don’t want to get entangled in matching people up?

It’s a mystery that Lyla and I decided is worth exploring further. In the meantime, Lyla has promised to let me know if she encounters any eligible bachelors I might be interested in. Because when it comes to being on the prowl in the Big Apple, four eyes are always better than two.

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November 14th, 2008 — 10:22pm

Earlier this week, I caught up with fellow travel PR maven and blogger Lyla () over brunch at one of my favorite neighborhood bistros, Beach Café.

Beach Cafe: This Upper East Side bistro is one of my favorites

As I enjoyed a delicious egg-white omelette loaded with cheddar cheese and spinach, newlywedded Lyla and I talked about the camaraderie of the blogging community and the challenges of thirty-something singlehood in NYC. While musing about the latter, we found ourselves discussing a peculiar phenomenon — male reticence about becoming involved in the matchmaking process.

Sex And The City’s Charlotte once suggested that the single friends of married men are “the city’s greatest untapped resource.” Both Lyla and I have found quite the opposite to be true, largely because it seems men aren’t often likely to recommend any of their friends for a blind date.

In fact, whenever I’ve asked guys who are spoken for if they have any nice, single friends, the response is usually no. I can’t help wondering — is this really because they don’t have any normal peers or simply because they don’t want to get entangled in matching people up?

It’s a mystery that Lyla and I decided is worth exploring further. In the meantime, Lyla has promised to let me know if she encounters any eligible bachelors I might be interested in. Because when it comes to being on the prowl in the Big Apple, four eyes are always better than two.

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