Category: TV news


April 22nd, 2014 — 7:51pm

It is often said that everything happens for a reason. When you’re navigating the unpredictable landscape of 40+ singlehood, this saying is more than a little hard to digest. But maybe there’s some truth to it after all—a comforting thought that occurs me to when I think about the winding road of my career.

Many moons ago, I started out in journalism. Temping as an administrative assistant for a division of Thomson Financial led to a permanent gig at one of their publications—and a reporter position eventually followed.

After making the leap to TV news (and doing small town stints in Maine, Illinois and Delaware), I took a break to get my master’s degree. One of my classmates worked for Fox News, and she secured me the interview that got me a job at the network.

When I was contemplating my next career reincarnation, I reached out to fellow journalism school alum and New York Travel Correspondent Valarie D’Elia. A freelance gig writing for her website inspired me to go into travel PR. Val connected me with ., which became my professional home for more than five years.

It was during this time that I had the pleasure of working with PR maven who was with the agency representing the Bahamas, where one of my resort clients was located. In 2012, Jen included me on an email blast she sent out that Starwood Hotels was looking for a Marketing Manager.

Jen and me at one of Starwood Preferred Guest (SPG)’s fantastic member events (September 2013)

As I’ve said to Jen many times since, she was literally my fairy jobmother. I have the good fortune of working with her again because she provides PR support for the two hotels I work for. If that isn’t full circle serendipity, I don’t know what is.

When I look back at my career, all the circuitous turns that didn’t make sense then make perfect sense now. I’ve never been more fulfilled job wise and I feel like everything I’ve done has prepared me for what I do with my workday. Like I am right where I’m supposed to be in my career.

How nice to think it’s possible I will someday be able to say the same thing about my love life.

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May 21st, 2010 — 11:35am

Over the years, I’ve found that there are more pitfalls than plusses to dating younger men. Back in 2001, my experience in Southern Illinois with fellow TV reporter Erik was an example of this.

He was 23, I was 27 — and we had very different ideas about who should take the lead when it comes to courting. During our second date, Erik implied over the phone that I should be doing the calling. I now Open The Vault and take you back to the spring of ‘01…

May 5, 2001
Marion, IL

Dear Diary,

I told Erik that not only do I not usually make the first move — I don’t make the first six.

“You’re really sweet,” he said with a smile, “But underneath, you’re hard core.”

Exactly.

He doesn’t call the next day, but surprises me the day after that by calling me from work.

Later in the week, I unexpectedly run into Erik in a courthouse covering the same story. He comes over to me and tries to charm some information out of me. I smile and say nothing. He is after all, still the competition. He asks if this is my first hearing. I say yes.

“Mine too,” he said, ”It was fun sharing it.”

Against my better judgment, I call him that night. Decent conversation, until the tail end of it, when he says he’s going to St. Louis again this weekend.

“Sunday night…” he says vaguely.

“What about Sunday night?” I ask.

“I’ll be back late Sunday night,” he says, and with that, he cuts me off.

Simply put, if Erik was really interested, he would have made a tentative date with me or said he’d be in touch upon his return. I don’t know if part of the problem is Erik assuming I will be the pursuer because I asked him out first.

And, in this particular situation, it doesn’t help that I’m living in the land of rednecks and frat boys. It’s unlikely someone else around here will capture my attention.

* * *

As it turned out, someone else would very much capture my attention — just as I was getting ready to leave Southern Illinois behind.

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May 8th, 2010 — 9:55pm

As I’ve recently rediscovered, unexpected connections of the romantic variety can happen when you change your zip code. So it also was back in 2001, after I moved to Southern Illinois for my first TV news reporting gig.

On The Air: Doing a live report for Southern Illinois’ ABC affiliate, 2001

About four months into my year-long stint in the Midwest, a reporter at a competing station caught my eye. I now Open The Vault and take you back to the spring of ‘01…

Marion, Illinois
April 18th, 2001

Dear Diary,

Earlier this afternoon, I received an email from Erik, the one man to really get my attention since I moved here.

I met him when we were out covering the same press conference not too long ago and was immediately taken with him. He’s cute, personable and from my new favorite (nearby) city, St. Louis.

I learned from a colleague that Erik is 23 and somewhat shy. After catching him on the news, I decided to call him at work — with the best excuse I could come up, needing restaurant recommendations for St. Louis. We had a nice ten-minute chat and he asked for my number “in case” he thought of any other eateries.

Time marched on and I didn’t hear from him. I’ve been turning over in my mind whether I should be bold enough to ask him out. But I’d already called him and I didn’t feel like risking rejection (now I appreciate what men have to go through!).

Imagine my surprise, then, when I saw his email today. In the message, he mentioned how we just missed each other by a few minutes on a recent interview — and ended by saying that he hopes we run into each other again soon.

That was all the encouragement I needed, so I wrote Erik back and asked him if he’d like to get a drink sometime. This is the first time ever in my whole life that I’ve made the first move, and surprisingly, it feels great.

* * *

April 19th, 2001

He called and we have a date for drinks. Could it be that, maybe, after a long barren period in my love life, romance is in the cards for me once again?

* * *

Erik would prove to a very welcome distraction to my quiet life in Southern Illinois — though it would be several more months before my defining relationship experience there took place.

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January 18th, 2010 — 5:00pm

Friday morning, I headed over to Fox News Channel for my client Tourism Queensland’s appearance on “Fox & Friends.”

Hello Again: “Fox & Friends” anchor (and former colleague) Steve Doocy and me

I had the pleasure of catching up with co-anchor and all-around good guy Steve Doocy, who greeted me with a big hug. We reminisced about the time when we shared a cubicle wall during my stint as an associate producer at Fox.

While we were talking, it hit me that a decade has passed since my FNC days — and that the winding road of my career has mirrored the twists and turns in my love life.

For seven years, I pursued my passion for TV news, traveling like a serial monogamist through jobs in writing, producing and on-camera reporting. With every gig, I learned something about myself — just as I have from each of the men I’ve dated.

I think that jobs, much like relationships, aren’t necessarily meant to last forever, but to prepare for you what comes next. By illuminating who you are and refining your vision of what you want for yourself, they help equip you to make that vision a reality, even if it means taking a few detours along the way.

Over time, I’ve found that each detour is less a bump in the road and more an opportunity to make a fresh start. Because in both life and love, it’s never too late to begin again.

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January 18th, 2010 — 12:00pm

Friday morning, I headed over to Fox News Channel for my client Tourism Queensland’s appearance on “Fox & Friends.”

Hello Again: “Fox & Friends” anchor (and former colleague) Steve Doocy and me

I had the pleasure of catching up with co-anchor and all-around good guy Steve Doocy, who greeted me with a big hug. We reminisced about the time when we shared a cubicle wall during my stint as an associate producer at Fox.

While we were talking, it hit me that a decade has passed since my FNC days — and that the winding road of my career has mirrored the twists and turns in my love life.

For seven years, I pursued my passion for TV news, traveling like a serial monogamist through jobs in writing, producing and on-camera reporting. With every gig, I learned something about myself — just as I have from each of the men I’ve dated.

I think that jobs, much like relationships, aren’t necessarily meant to last forever, but to prepare for you what comes next. By illuminating who you are and refining your vision of what you want for yourself, they help equip you to make that vision a reality, even if it means taking a few detours along the way.

Over time, I’ve found that each detour is less a bump in the road and more an opportunity to make a fresh start. Because in both life and love, it’s never too late to begin again.

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September 6th, 2009 — 10:01pm

I recently had the pleasure of catching up with my former Fox News boss and good friend Jerry.

Over a delicious lunch at Ben’s Kosher Deli & Restaurant in NYC’s Garment District, we reminisced about our days together at Fox ten years ago. It should probably be illegal to have as much fun at work as we did.

Shepard Smith: This Fox News anchor fronts the primetime show that I worked on

As we recalled that magical time, I couldn’t help thinking about my former career path.

Before jumping ship to the world of public relations, I spent seven years working in TV news. From taking flight in a golf cart powered by an electric parachute to interviewing newsmakers big and small (Senator Bob Dole, Jared the Subway sandwich guy), I enjoyed plenty of adventures in pursuit of the day’s news. Here are some of the highlights — By The Numbers:

Number of jobs in TV news: 7
Number of TV news jobs that required moving out of state to small towns: 3
Number of on-camera reporting jobs: 2
Number of TV news gigs abroad (in Sydney, Australia): 1
Number of winter weather disasters experienced during TV news stints: 2

Back in ‘97, I was a morning news producer in Bangor, Maine when a devastating ice storm hit. Later, during a 2003 blizzard in Delaware that shut down the state, I did a live report on the disaster from a waist high snow bank.

Yes, producing the news may not always be glamorous but one thing is for sure — it’s one hell of a ride.

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September 6th, 2009 — 5:01pm

I recently had the pleasure of catching up with my former Fox News boss and good friend Jerry.

Over a delicious lunch at Ben’s Kosher Deli & Restaurant in NYC’s Garment District, we reminisced about our days together at Fox ten years ago. It should probably be illegal to have as much fun at work as we did.

Shepard Smith: This Fox News anchor fronts the primetime show that I worked on

As we recalled that magical time, I couldn’t help thinking about my former career path.

Before jumping ship to the world of public relations, I spent seven years working in TV news. From taking flight in a golf cart powered by an electric parachute to interviewing newsmakers big and small (Senator Bob Dole, Jared the Subway sandwich guy), I enjoyed plenty of adventures in pursuit of the day’s news. Here are some of the highlights — By The Numbers:

Number of jobs in TV news: 7
Number of TV news jobs that required moving out of state to small towns: 3
Number of on-camera reporting jobs: 2
Number of TV news gigs abroad (in Sydney, Australia): 1
Number of winter weather disasters experienced during TV news stints: 2

Back in ‘97, I was a morning news producer in Bangor, Maine when a devastating ice storm hit. Later, during a 2003 blizzard in Delaware that shut down the state, I did a live report on the disaster from a waist high snow bank.

Yes, producing the news may not always be glamorous but one thing is for sure — it’s one hell of a ride.

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June 19th, 2009 — 11:00pm

During my ten year journalism school reunion back in April, I attended a panel about reinventing yourself. I couldn’t help thinking about how that phrase has applied to my career before and since attending Columbia‘s j-school.

Reporting Live: That’s me with the microphone during my on-air days at WBOC-TV in Dover, Delaware, 2002

It’s been quite a journey from my days as a fresh-faced college graduate to my current profession of travel PR. I’ve written about municipal bonds for a trade newspaper, reported live during a Delaware blizzard and researched business segments for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Here are some of the bends in the long and winding road of my career — By The Numbers:

Number of jobs since graduating from Mount Holyoke College: 10
Number of career changes: 2
Number of small market TV news jobs outside of New York: 4
Number of overseas jobs: 1
Number of years spent working in PR: 4.5

Four and a half years after making the transition to travel PR and joining Quinn & Company, I feel the same as I did when I first started — fortunate to work for talented, honorable people and to be promoting one of my biggest passions, travel. Even better, I get to do this in the world’s greatest city.

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June 19th, 2009 — 6:00pm

During my ten year journalism school reunion back in April, I attended a panel about reinventing yourself. I couldn’t help thinking about how that phrase has applied to my career before and since attending Columbia‘s j-school.

Reporting Live: That’s me with the microphone during my on-air days at WBOC-TV in Dover, Delaware, 2002

It’s been quite a journey from my days as a fresh-faced college graduate to my current profession of travel PR. I’ve written about municipal bonds for a trade newspaper, reported live during a Delaware blizzard and researched business segments for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Here are some of the bends in the long and winding road of my career — By The Numbers:

Number of jobs since graduating from Mount Holyoke College: 10
Number of career changes: 2
Number of small market TV news jobs outside of New York: 4
Number of overseas jobs: 1
Number of years spent working in PR: 4.5

Four and a half years after making the transition to travel PR and joining Quinn & Company, I feel the same as I did when I first started — fortunate to work for talented, honorable people and to be promoting one of my biggest passions, travel. Even better, I get to do this in the world’s greatest city.

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November 18th, 2008 — 7:39pm
The other night, I heard from Michael, a guy that my friend and fellow travel PR maven/blogger wants to set me up with. As we chatted about our mutual appreciation for Latin dancing and NYC’s theater scene, I couldn’t help thinking about the unpredictability of blind dates – and some of the memorable setups I’ve experienced.

There’s been no shortage of blind dates that failed to ignite any sparks. Like the tête à tête with a 40-something businessman who scoffed at my decision to leave the world of TV news behind for a career in PR. Or the who kept me waiting for a half an hour then proceeded to talk only about himself.

For every lackluster matchmaking attempt, though, I’ve been fortunate enough to experience a few blind date successes that made those disappointing evenings worth it.

Ten years ago, a college friend’s British-born husband suggested I meet up with David, a friend of his who had just moved to the Big Apple. The chemistry between us was immediate. Over the course of a year and a half together, David would become my good guy benchmark, seeing me through the devastating loss of my mother and taking the grand gesture to a whole new level with roses by the hundred.

Parade of Roses: Five dozen of the twenty-five dozen (!) roses that my British beau David gave me for my 25th birthday, January 1999

In 2001, at the tail end of my year-long TV reporter stint in Southern Illinois, my neighbor’s daughter invited me to dinner with her stepson Steve. I ended up changing my return flight to New York three times, as Steve and I fell into one of the most passionate romances I’ve ever had. Our friendship endures to this day.

Michael and I are scheduled to meet for drinks sometime this week. Though It’s too soon to tell how this latest go round of blind date roulette will turn out, I’m just happy to be back in the game.

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