Category: foot surgery


January 1st, 2009 — 11:38pm

Last Saturday, I caught up with my cousin and soul sister Alexandra for an eventful girls night out — one that offered an enticing glimpse at what the new year might bring.

Over a few glasses of sangria and sublime Mexican food at on NYC’s Upper East Side, Alexa and I had (as always) plenty to talk about. Along with the potential pitfalls of reconciling with an ex, we covered the challenges of juggling work and school (Alexa’s pursuing a degree in music education) and the joys of recovering from a physical setback — i.e., my foot surgery back in October.

Best Friends: Me and my cousin Alexandra having fun at O’Flanagan’s

My cousin hadn’t seen me since the weekend of my surgery, so she was happy to see I’m back on both feet again. That, along with her recently completing finals, gave us plenty to celebrate when we moved onto , one of the best pubs in my neighborhood.

In addition to a friendly and attentive bar staff and down to earth, unpretentious crowd, O’Flanagan’s offers great live entertainment. While Alexandra and I were at the bar, she struck up a conversation with one of the vocalists for the night’s cover band, .

East Coast: An awesome cover band with talented and friendly musicians

East Coast had everyone on the dance floor with their rollicking renditions of hits from the last 40 years. As we shook our groove things to Rihanna’s “Please Don’t Stop The Music,” I couldn’t stop smiling — savoring the delight of dancing for the first time in months.

During a break to catch my breath, a guy leaned over and asked me if I was single. When I said yes, he asked–

“How is that possible?”

“Actually,” I said bemusedly, “That’s a good question.”

I also had the chance to flex my flirting muscles while watching a couple of guys play pool in O’Flanagan’s back room. One of them, an adorable forty-something named Dave, quickly invited me to join the game and proceeded to engage me in a round of TV trivia.

Before the night was over, Alexandra — a talented singer — joined East Coast in belting out Alicia Keys’ “No One.” I, meanwhile, offered my more limited vocal talents in supporting the band’s rendition of Billy Joel’s “You May Be Right.”

As we headed home around 3am, I couldn’t help thinking that the night marked a fresh start for me. I’m ready to, literally, hit the ground running now that it’s a new year, and get back into the dating scene. And I will definitely be dropping by O’Flanagan’s again soon. After all, my pool skills could use a little practice.

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January 1st, 2009 — 6:38pm

Last Saturday, I caught up with my cousin and soul sister Alexandra for an eventful girls night out — one that offered an enticing glimpse at what the new year might bring.

Over a few glasses of sangria and sublime Mexican food at on NYC’s Upper East Side, Alexa and I had (as always) plenty to talk about. Along with the potential pitfalls of reconciling with an ex, we covered the challenges of juggling work and school (Alexa’s pursuing a degree in music education) and the joys of recovering from a physical setback — i.e., my foot surgery back in October.

Best Friends: Me and my cousin Alexandra having fun at O’Flanagan’s

My cousin hadn’t seen me since the weekend of my surgery, so she was happy to see I’m back on both feet again. That, along with her recently completing finals, gave us plenty to celebrate when we moved onto , one of the best pubs in my neighborhood.

In addition to a friendly and attentive bar staff and down to earth, unpretentious crowd, O’Flanagan’s offers great live entertainment. While Alexandra and I were at the bar, she struck up a conversation with one of the vocalists for the night’s cover band, .

East Coast: An awesome cover band with talented and friendly musicians

East Coast had everyone on the dance floor with their rollicking renditions of hits from the last 40 years. As we shook our groove things to Rihanna’s “Please Don’t Stop The Music,” I couldn’t stop smiling — savoring the delight of dancing for the first time in months.

During a break to catch my breath, a guy leaned over and asked me if I was single. When I said yes, he asked–

“How is that possible?”

“Actually,” I said bemusedly, “That’s a good question.”

I also had the chance to flex my flirting muscles while watching a couple of guys play pool in O’Flanagan’s back room. One of them, an adorable forty-something named Dave, quickly invited me to join the game and proceeded to engage me in a round of TV trivia.

Before the night was over, Alexandra — a talented singer — joined East Coast in belting out Alicia Keys’ “No One.” I, meanwhile, offered my more limited vocal talents in supporting the band’s rendition of Billy Joel’s “You May Be Right.”

As we headed home around 3am, I couldn’t help thinking that the night marked a fresh start for me. I’m ready to, literally, hit the ground running now that it’s a new year, and get back into the dating scene. And I will definitely be dropping by O’Flanagan’s again soon. After all, my pool skills could use a little practice.

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November 20th, 2008 — 2:44am

Tonight, I had the pleasure of catching up with my good friend and colleague Caroline over dinner at , a casual Thai fusion cafe on Ninth Avenue.

Aura: Good, inexpensive Thai fusion cuisine served up in a cozy cafe setting

After shared appetizers of steamed shrimp dumplings and spring rolls, I enjoyed beef pad thai made even tastier by Aura’s friendly waitstaff and reasonable prices ($16 per person for two courses and a pot of tea).

Our last was four weeks ago so Caroline and I had much to discuss. We talked about anticipating the upcoming holidays, dreading our beloved colleague Morty’s imminent departure and delighting in the indulgence of nail salon pampering.

Speaking of the latter, I mentioned how much I’m looking forward to a pedicure now that my foot is on the mend from last month’s surgery. I hit another recovery milestone this week — wearing a regular shoe post-surgery for the first time. What better way to celebrate than by sprucing up my toes with a splash of pink?

As I leaned on Caroline’s arm while she walked me to a cab, it occurred to me for the umpteenth time that the support of friends has made all the difference in my recovery. When it comes to a prescription for healing, there’s no better medicine.

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November 19th, 2008 — 9:44pm

Tonight, I had the pleasure of catching up with my good friend and colleague Caroline over dinner at , a casual Thai fusion cafe on Ninth Avenue.

Aura: Good, inexpensive Thai fusion cuisine served up in a cozy cafe setting

After shared appetizers of steamed shrimp dumplings and spring rolls, I enjoyed beef pad thai made even tastier by Aura’s friendly waitstaff and reasonable prices ($16 per person for two courses and a pot of tea).

Our last was four weeks ago so Caroline and I had much to discuss. We talked about anticipating the upcoming holidays, dreading our beloved colleague Morty’s imminent departure and delighting in the indulgence of nail salon pampering.

Speaking of the latter, I mentioned how much I’m looking forward to a pedicure now that my foot is on the mend from last month’s surgery. I hit another recovery milestone this week — wearing a regular shoe post-surgery for the first time. What better way to celebrate than by sprucing up my toes with a splash of pink?

As I leaned on Caroline’s arm while she walked me to a cab, it occurred to me for the umpteenth time that the support of friends has made all the difference in my recovery. When it comes to a prescription for healing, there’s no better medicine.

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November 14th, 2008 — 2:56am

Today marked a wonderful juncture in my recovery from foot surgery — hobbling to and from work for the first time minus crutches or a cain.

I was only a few yards from my building when a woman, noticing my post-surgery shoe and slight limp, stopped to ask me what procedure I’d undergone. Upon informing her it was bunion removal, she was even more inquisitive because she is about to go through the same thing.

As I told her that returning to work a week later is doable and that the pain subsides in a matter of days, I could tell she was relieved. And in the course of helping to put her mind at ease, I was struck all over again at the body’s amazing power to heal.

I ended up being reminded of this several times today. First, with several colleagues commenting on my increased mobility. Then tonight, with my doorman happily observing me walk unassisted, saying–

“Looking good, looking good!”

I smiled, grateful for the encouragement and the fact that with each passing day, I’m inching closer toward finding my footing again.

Over the last five weeks, I’ve re-learned what it means to literally take things one step at a time. It’s a lesson I won’t soon forget and one that I think will make me more sure footed, in more ways than one.

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November 13th, 2008 — 9:56pm

Today marked a wonderful juncture in my recovery from foot surgery — hobbling to and from work for the first time minus crutches or a cain.

I was only a few yards from my building when a woman, noticing my post-surgery shoe and slight limp, stopped to ask me what procedure I’d undergone. Upon informing her it was bunion removal, she was even more inquisitive because she is about to go through the same thing.

As I told her that returning to work a week later is doable and that the pain subsides in a matter of days, I could tell she was relieved. And in the course of helping to put her mind at ease, I was struck all over again at the body’s amazing power to heal.

I ended up being reminded of this several times today. First, with several colleagues commenting on my increased mobility. Then tonight, with my doorman happily observing me walk unassisted, saying–

“Looking good, looking good!”

I smiled, grateful for the encouragement and the fact that with each passing day, I’m inching closer toward finding my footing again.

Over the last five weeks, I’ve re-learned what it means to literally take things one step at a time. It’s a lesson I won’t soon forget and one that I think will make me more sure footed, in more ways than one.

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November 8th, 2008 — 1:56am

Earlier this week, my friend Cindy and I caught up over dinner at Shabu Shabu, a Japanese eatery on the Upper East Side with an impressive 30-year history. This was my first visit to Shabu Shabu and, for the most part, I enjoyed it.

Shabu Shabu: This laidback UES eatery delivers decent sushi and service with a smile

While my appetizer choice (shumai that stuck to the bowl) was underwhelming, I enjoyed a tasty fatty tuna roll along with eel and white tuna sashimi.

Cindy and I eyed with curiosity another table of diners enjoying the Japanese art for which the restaurant is named. Literally meaning “swish swish,” Shabu Shabu refers to the process of cooking beef and vegetables by dipping them in boiling water. A small butane stove is brought to the table, topped by a pot of liquid in which diners dunk morsels presented on a platter.

Over dinner, Cindy and I talked about the Renaissance of Atlantic City, the challenge of coming up with creative Halloween costumes, and some of the surefire ways to drop 10 pounds in a jiffy — including breakups or, as I recently discovered, foot surgery.

My only regret of the night was not trying Shabu Shabu’s eponymous specialty. Next time.

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November 7th, 2008 — 8:56pm

Earlier this week, my friend Cindy and I caught up over dinner at Shabu Shabu, a Japanese eatery on the Upper East Side with an impressive 30-year history. This was my first visit to Shabu Shabu and, for the most part, I enjoyed it.

Shabu Shabu: This laidback UES eatery delivers decent sushi and service with a smile

While my appetizer choice (shumai that stuck to the bowl) was underwhelming, I enjoyed a tasty fatty tuna roll along with eel and white tuna sashimi.

Cindy and I eyed with curiosity another table of diners enjoying the Japanese art for which the restaurant is named. Literally meaning “swish swish,” Shabu Shabu refers to the process of cooking beef and vegetables by dipping them in boiling water. A small butane stove is brought to the table, topped by a pot of liquid in which diners dunk morsels presented on a platter.

Over dinner, Cindy and I talked about the Renaissance of Atlantic City, the challenge of coming up with creative Halloween costumes, and some of the surefire ways to drop 10 pounds in a jiffy — including breakups or, as I recently discovered, foot surgery.

My only regret of the night was not trying Shabu Shabu’s eponymous specialty. Next time.

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October 30th, 2008 — 1:16am

The other day, a 60-something neighbor of mine came by to fill me in about her recent reunion in Sweden with a long-distance love from years ago. Though the reunion didn’t turn out as she had hoped, it did confirm one thing.

“I’m tired,” she said, “of being surrounded by women.”

Her epiphany that she is ready to find love again got me to thinking about a subject that’s come up more than once lately – how easy it is to fill up your life so much that there’s no room for romance in it.

Ko Sushi: Delicious Japanese fare, great service and the setting of a recent conversation about singlehood

Over dinner at neighborhood delight Ko Sushi, my friend Lauren rhapsodized about the joys of living alone. In the same vein, one of my cousins recently mentioned how happy she is with her life as a 30-something single, a sentiment I share.

As I told my newly romance-minded neighbor, New York is the ideal place to be an independent woman flying solo. Some of this is because we’re in the majority (I once read somewhere that there are approximately 100,000 more single women in the Big Apple than single men). The rest is because when you live in NYC, with its endless parade of engaging diversions and interesting people, you’re never really alone.

Still, for as much as I’m enjoying my love affair with New York, I can’t help thinking it might be time to start carving out more space for a different kind of long-term relationship. I’m looking forward, once I’m fully recovered from my recent foot surgery, to being on the prowl again — and to all of the fun that goes along with it here in my hometown.

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October 29th, 2008 — 8:16pm

The other day, a 60-something neighbor of mine came by to fill me in about her recent reunion in Sweden with a long-distance love from years ago. Though the reunion didn’t turn out as she had hoped, it did confirm one thing.

“I’m tired,” she said, “of being surrounded by women.”

Her epiphany that she is ready to find love again got me to thinking about a subject that’s come up more than once lately – how easy it is to fill up your life so much that there’s no room for romance in it.

Ko Sushi: Delicious Japanese fare, great service and the setting of a recent conversation about singlehood

Over dinner at neighborhood delight Ko Sushi, my friend Lauren rhapsodized about the joys of living alone. In the same vein, one of my cousins recently mentioned how happy she is with her life as a 30-something single, a sentiment I share.

As I told my newly romance-minded neighbor, New York is the ideal place to be an independent woman flying solo. Some of this is because we’re in the majority (I once read somewhere that there are approximately 100,000 more single women in the Big Apple than single men). The rest is because when you live in NYC, with its endless parade of engaging diversions and interesting people, you’re never really alone.

Still, for as much as I’m enjoying my love affair with New York, I can’t help thinking it might be time to start carving out more space for a different kind of long-term relationship. I’m looking forward, once I’m fully recovered from my recent foot surgery, to being on the prowl again — and to all of the fun that goes along with it here in my hometown.

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